Archive for category Vegetarian/Vegan

Farmer’s Market Fresh Meal

pea pasta_sm

Lobster Ravioli, fresh peas and sugar snap pea pods make a fast healthy dinner.

We are so excited that the Avila Beach Farmer’s Market is back!  It makes dinner so much easier.  And ooooh, the spring goodness we can find there.  We were pulling a long day at the tasting room and Mr. Vino suggested hitting the Farmer’s Market for dinner.  I think that he was thinking to pick up some fish tacos.  Me, I hit the produce guys and the fresh pasta guy for this riff on a recipe from Cooking Light.  And oh, my – it was amazing with our new 2016 Beach Blonde Pinot Grigio!!

Pea and Snap Pea Pasta
6 oz fresh sugar snap peas (get 8 ounces cuz you are going to eat some of them while prepping)
1 C fresh shelled peas
3 T really nice olive oil
Juice and grated lemon peel from one fresh lemon
2 oz shaved Asiago or Parmesan
Salt & Pepper
Radish Microgreens (yep, back in the day we called them “sprouts”)
Lobster ravioli (or other delicate pasta like Pappardelle.  It’s vegetarian with plain pasta!!)

This is so dang easy it’s almost embarrassing and the whole thing comes together in the time it takes to cook the pasta.

Bring a large pot of water to boil over high heat.  Once boiling, add snap peas and cook until they turn really bright green (1 minute or so – don’t overcook).  Remove the snap peas with a slotted spoon and put them in a bowl of cold water to shock them.  The drain on paper towels.

Add the pasta to the boiling water and cook per package instructions.  Add the fresh peas during the last 30 seconds.

While pasta is cooking, combine the olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper in a large bowl.  Whisk to combine.  When pasta is done, drain pasta and pea mixture.  Add pasta, peas and snap peas to bowl and toss lightly to combine.

Plate pasta and top with shaved cheese and microgreens.  Don’t have Asiago or Parm?  This also is really nice with Feta.

Fresh, healthy, delicious.

 

 

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Mushrooms du Rhone

Mrs. Vino’s Riff on Beef Bourguignon – only where’s the beef????20170423_200311
Make & Serve with 2014 Morovno Petite Sirah

Many of you know that Mr. & Mrs. Vino are trying for a more vegetable-forward diet. This has provided some super fun opportunities for Mrs. Vino to play in the kitchen. This riff on Beef Bourguignon uses a Petite Sirah (a Rhone varietal) instead of burgundy and hearty mushrooms instead of beef. And is vegegarian (you will NEVER miss the meat). This is easily converted to a vegan dish by using a slurry of 1 T water and 1 T cornstarch instead of the Beurre Marni to thicken. PS, Beurre Marni was a new technique for me, taught to me by chef Google. But I will totally use it again.

This recipe looks really long – but only because I had fun writing it. Took about 40 minutes total to prepare.

2 large Portobella Mushrooms
1 little blue Styrofoam package of Crimini mushrooms (or Baby Portobellas), sliced
1/2 C. Dried Shiitake mushrooms (I get mine from Costco and it is my new kitchen staple)
1 C. boiling water
½ Onion, diced
2 carrots, peeled and diced
2 C. vegetable broth
1 C. Morovino Petite Sirah
3 T Olive Oil (divided)
2 t. Herbs de Provence
2T Balsamic Vinegar
2 t. Salt
2 t. Pepper
1T Butter, softened
1T Flour

In a large coffee mug or small bowl, rehydrate the dried mushrooms in the boiling water – this will take about 20 minutes. Preheat your oven to 425 degrees. Remove the stems from the large Portobella mushrooms by breaking them off. Then remove the dark gills by scraping them out with a spoon. Put the mushrooms gill side down on your cutting board and cut the caps into thick slices (like 3/4” thick). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Place the mushrooms on the baking sheet, drizzle with 1 T of olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast the mushroom caps 10 minutes. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and using your kitchen tongs, turn the mushrooms over. Return sheet to oven and roast for an additional 15 minutes.

While Portobellas are roasting, heat 1 T of oil in a heavy bottomed skillet over medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and saute until soft (4-5 minutes). Remove the onions and carrots to a small bowl. Add the remaining Tablespoon of olive oil, notch the heat up to medium high and add the sliced Crimini to pan. You don’t need to add more oil – no matter how much oil you add the mushrooms will absorb it. Just keep stirring the mushrooms around so they don’t stick and they will release their own juicy goodness. Saute the mushrooms for 5 ish minutes, until they start to brown.

While mushrooms are sauteing, use the back of a fork to cream together the butter and flour in a small bowl. If you were to then roll it into pea sized balls, you’d have Beurre Marni – great for thickening soups and sauces. Me? Really? Roll into pea sized balls – not likely. Just leave the mixture in the bowl for now.

When the mushrooms have browned, add the Petite Sirah to the pan and deglaze for a minute (aah, I love the sound of a good deglaze). Drain the Shiitakes (reserving the liquid) and add them into the pan with the carrots and onions. Add the vegetable broth and the reserved liquid in which you rehydrated the mushrooms (mushroom broth) to the pan. Reduce heat back to medium. Add the Herbs de Provence and simmer strongly (not quite boil) for 10 minutes until liquid starts to thicken. At this point, your roasted Portobellas are probably ready. Turn the heat off in the oven, but leave them in to keep warm until the sauce is ready.

Back to the Beurre Marni. Instead of rolling it into ridiculous pea sized balls then adding them to the sauce, just use the fork to add the butter/flour mixture to the simmering sauce in small increments – stirring between additions. Continue at a strong simmer for another 5 to 10 minutes until the mixture has thickened. Add Balsamic vinegar. Stir, then add salt and pepper to taste.

I serve Mushrooms du Rhone over a hearty pasta, but it’s also great over polenta, mashed potatoes or a toasted hearty bread. Arrange thusly. Pasta/bread/polenta/potatoes on plate (choose one, not all). Slices of roasted Portobella on top of pasta, or whichever. Spoonfuls of mushroomy sauce atop Portobellas. Top with a sprinkle of chopped parsley for extra credit. Green salad on the side. Serves 4.

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Putting Forks Over Knives

This January, Vino Man and I decided to move to a more plant based diet.  Better for us.  Better for the environment.  Tasty-licious.  This move was made easier when we signed up for the amazing Talley Farms Fresh Harvest Program and started picking up a box of amazing, seasonal, locally-sourced produce every week. (Info on Talley Farms Fresh Harvest, here.)  That, too was good for our bodies.  And good for our pocket book – the Jr. share is less than $20/week (I was already spending that much on veggies at the grocer).

In honor of our Tenth Wineversary, we decided that our monthly newsletters would feature some of our great wines in the past.  So we dipped into the cellar and pulled out a Double Gold Medal Award Winning 2009 Dolcetto.  We hadn’t sampled it in a while, and thought it would be a great opportunity to see how it was aging.

But in our new more veggie-based world, we wanted to try the Dolcetto with a Vegetarian duck-tofumeal.  Big wines and plant based meals pose some challenges, but I’m always up for a food challenge.  Having recently been introduced to an incredibly amazing product called Kimbo Veggie Smoked Duck (Tofu), I thought it would be a great experiment.

Full disclosure.  I usually hate tofu.  It’s my “Bête Noire”.  In my 40 years of cooking (and I grew up cooking Asian-style dishes) I have never been able to successfully execute tofu.  Until now.

The recipe below is VERY quick and easy.  Came together in about 15 minutes (excluding preparation of the rice).  The Veggie Smoked Duck is available at larger Asian-style markets.  My friend Judy brings it up from SoCal for me by the box – cuz the Vino man loves this too.  Enjoy!

smoked-duck-tofu-stir-fryOh yeah, the Dolcetto?  Well Damn.  That Dolcetto is good stuff.  The 2009 is prime right now – even smoother than when you put it in your cellar.  It was great with this dish and will still absolutely hold up to lamb, steak and meatier dishes too.  We recommend that this wine be consumed this year – before the fruit begins to fade out.

VEGGIE SMOKED DUCK STIR FRY

1/2 large head Napa Cabbage, shredded (or thinly sliced)
1 bunch broccoli – cut off florets, then peel and slice the stalk (it’s the best part)
1/2 large onion – peeled and sliced thinly from root to tip
2 cloves of garlic, chopped
1 C. frozen Edamame (shelled), defrosted
1 1″ piece of ginger, grated
1/2 C. Garlic Hoisin Sauce (We like Soy Vay)
1/4 C. Sake or dry white wine
1/2 package of Kimbo Veggie Smoked Duck, sliced, then quartered
2 T Canola oil, divided use
1/2 bunch green onions, sliced thinly on the diagonal
Brown Jasmine Rice

Prepare your rice via your preferred method.  I like my rice cooker – perfect rice every time.  When there’s about 10-15 minutes left on your rice, start your stir fry.  Preheat your oven to 250 degress.  In a large heavy bottomed skillet or wok, heat 1 T of Canola oil over medium high heat until it shimmers.  Add the onions and saute until they are limp and lightly brown, about 3 minutes.  Stir constantly, as you are using pretty high temperatures.  You need to keep the food moving or it will scorch. Add broccoli florets and stems and saute another 3 minutes. Then add cabbage and Edamame and saute 2 minutes more.  Add the garlic and half the Hoisin and all the Sake/wine.  Stir for about 1 minute until the garlic is fragrant.  Put the veggies in your serving dish and place in the oven to keep warm for a few minutes.  Put the second tablespoon of oil in the saute pan and heat till shimmering.  Lower heat to medium.  Add the smoked duck and the second half of the Hoisin sauce and heat until just warmed through – 2-3 minutes.  Pull out the veggies, top them with the smoked duck, then sprinkle with the green onions.  Serve atop the rice with the Morovino Dolcetto vintage of your choice.  Amazing.

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